El concepto “artistic research” expresa la íntima conexión entre arte e investigación en el trabajo de los artistas con formación universitaria. El blog: “Investigación, arte, universidad. Documentos para un debate” nace a partir de dos Proyectos de Innovación Educativa, dentro de la Facultad de Bellas Artes de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, como seminario permanente de reflexión en torno a estas cuestiones, abierto a los estudiantes del Máster en Investigación en Arte y Creación [MIAC]. Fruto de este seminario ha sido la publicación del libro: Investigación artística y Universidad: materiales para un debate, Selina Blasco (ed.), Ediciones Asimétricas, Madrid, 2013; con la participación de: Aurora Fernández Polanco, Beatriz Fernández Ruiz, Helena Grande, Lila Insúa Lintridis, Javier Ramírez Serrano y Alejandro Simón.


The notion of “artistic research” addresses the close connection between art and investigation within the work of artists trained in universities. This blog originates from two Projects of Innovation in Education at the School of Fine Arts (Facultad de Bellas Artes) of Universidad Complutense the Madrid. It functions as a continuous semminar fostering both debate and reflection upon issues related to artistic research and as an open forum for the students of UCM’s Master in Artistic and Creative Research (Máster en Investigación en Arte y Creación [MIAC]). As a result of this semminar, we have published a compilation of essays on artistic research edited by UCM’s professor Selina Blasco. Entitled, Investigación artística y Universidad: materiales para un debate (Madrid: Ediciones Asimétricas, 2013), it includes texts by Aurora Fernández Polanco, Beatriz Fernández Ruiz, Helena Grande, Lila Insúa Lintridis, Javier Ramírez Serrano, and Alejandro Simón.

Lessons Learned: Struggles and Knowledges of Dissent -- Lina Dokuzović

On October 20th 2009, even Viennese leftists were surprised as students and staff from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna began to protest, occupying the university. That moment was preceded by self-organized group actions and research on the Bologna Process reforms that were changing the way people were learning and teaching. Several actions, including a series of tours, presenting facts about the reform process collected from self-organized research throughout the classrooms of the Academy, built a foothold for the expansion of a small group of politicized students and staff. As the situation became tighter – less time, availability, resources, flexibility and space for extra-curricular research and self-reflective questioning – stronger alliances began forming between groups at various Viennese universities. The subsequent long-lasting process of self-organization and struggle led to a greater collective understanding and development of the forms of protest and organization to follow.

Más en: http://eipcp.net/transversal/1210/dokuzovic/en